Canine Uveitis and the Veterinary Technician

Canine Uveitis and the Veterinary Technician

Uveitis can be not only a confusing and frustrating diagnosis for owners, but also a sign of underlying, potentially zoonotic disease. This article provides an overview of essential information for assisting clients and protecting the veterinary team.

July/August 2017 | Volume 2, Issue 4

Luxating Patellas: Pathology and Treatment Options

Luxating Patellas: Pathology and Treatment Options

Patellar luxation is one of the most common hindlimb orthopedic abnormalities seen in dogs. This article discusses the anatomy, diagnosis, management, and other aspects of patellar luxation with which veterinary technicians should be familiar.

July/August 2017 | Volume 2, Issue 4

The Veterinary Technician’s Role in Implementing Fear Free

The Veterinary Technician’s Role in Implementing Fear Free

Currently, Fear Freesm certification is only possible for individuals; however, starting in 2018, veterinary hospitals will be able to become Fear Free certified. Learn how you can play a role in decreasing patient stress to improve patient care.

July/August 2017 | Volume 2, Issue 4


Feline Heartworm Disease: Fact or Fiction?

In areas where dogs are exposed to mosquitoes that carry Dirofilaria immitis, so are cats. Feline heartworm disease differs from canine disease in many ways, making it important for veterinary technicians to be aware of the risks and clinical signs in cats.

May/June 2017 | Volume 2, Issue 3

A Technician’s Role in the Treatment of Demodex Patients

A Technician’s Role in the Treatment of Demodex Patients

Diagnosis of demodicosis depends on identifying Demodex mites in dermal samples. Read this article for tips on how to obtain and analyze diagnostic samples.

March/April 2017 | Volume 2, Issue 2


Pain Management and Becoming a Patient Advocate

Information on pain management and assessment in veterinary patients has grown tremendously. This article provides an overview of common pharmaceuticals as well as advanced multimodal techniques to help veterinary technicians realize their role as patient advocates in minimizing pain.

March/April 2017 | Volume 2, Issue 2

Radiographic Positioning: Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes, Part 2

Radiographic Positioning: Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes, Part 2

This second of two articles on radiographic positioning provides an overview of proper patient restraint as well as techniques to obtain good-quality radiographs of the stifles, pelvis, and phalanges.

March/April 2017 | Volume 2, Issue 2

Puppies for the Holidays: Keeping Them Fear Free℠

Puppies for the Holidays: Keeping Them Fear Free℠

Inevitably, January brings new patients that were given as gifts for the holidays. Help your clients get their new puppies off to a good start in the family and at the clinic with advice on positive training techniques.

January/February 2017 | Volume 2, Issue 1

Many veterinary practices incorporate digital images of new patients when creating patient records. Veterinary practices also use digital imaging to document specific patient conditions and, increasingly, to obtain images in the radiology suite. Many practices take “before and after” images of patients undergoing dental procedures to provide visual evidence of treatment to clients. Photographs can be used to help explain concepts or disease conditions to pet owners, which may lead to increased client compliance. Digital images can also be used to share patient information during consultations with other veterinary professionals and to create an image library for teaching purposes.

Digital Microscopy

Adding digital microscopy to a veterinary practice can greatly enhance recordkeeping and serve as a valuable tool for client education. This article provides an overview of the benefits of this technology and some useful resources for learning more.

January/February 2017 | Volume 2, Issue 1

When Caring Hurts: Dealing with Depression in Veterinary Medicine

When Caring Hurts: Dealing with Depression in Veterinary Medicine

Depression is one of the most common mental health disorders in the United States and is strikingly prevalent in the veterinary community. Get tips on how to differentiate depression from burnout and how to find help for yourself or your coworkers.

January/February 2017 | Volume 2, Issue 1